Last edited by Zulkigis
Tuesday, February 11, 2020 | History

8 edition of Nicomachean Ethics Second Edition (Hackett Publishing Co.) found in the catalog.

Nicomachean Ethics Second Edition (Hackett Publishing Co.)

  • 241 Want to read
  • 13 Currently reading

Published by Hackett Publishing Company .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Ancient Western philosophy to c 500,
  • Aristotle,
  • Philosophy,
  • Ethics & Moral Philosophy,
  • Ethics,
  • History & Surveys - Ancient & Classical

  • Edition Notes

    ContributionsTerence Irwin (Translator)
    The Physical Object
    FormatLibrary binding
    Number of Pages360
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL8374284M
    ISBN 100872204650
    ISBN 109780872204652

    The section is yet another explanation of why the Ethics will not start from first principles, which would mean starting out by trying to discuss "The Good" as a universal thing that all things called good have in common. For among statements about conduct those which are general apply more widely, but those which are particular are more genuine, since conduct has to do with individual cases, and our statements must harmonize with the facts in these cases. The study of the Good is part of political science, because politics concerns itself with securing the highest ends for human life. But most people do not do these, but take refuge in theory and think they are being philosophers and will become good in this way, behaving somewhat like patients who listen attentively to their doctors, but do none of the things they are ordered to do.

    Now since activities differ in respect of goodness and badness, Nicomachean Ethics Second Edition book some are worthy to be chosen, others to be avoided, and others neutral, so, too, are the pleasures; for to each activity there is a proper pleasure. Everything that humans pursue, like pleasure or honor, are just lesser pursuits that are meant to lead to happiness. There are also means in the passions and concerned with the passions; since shame is not a virtue, and yet praise is extended to the modest man. Whether it be reason or something else that is this element which is thought to be our natural ruler and guide and to take thought of things noble and divine, whether it be itself also divine or only the most divine element in us, the activity of this in accordance with its proper virtue will be perfect happiness. To the poet Dante, he was simply 'the master of those who know'. And no one would choose to live with the intellect of a child throughout his life, however much he were to be pleased at the things that children are pleased at, nor to get enjoyment by doing some most disgraceful deed, though he were never to feel any pain in consequence.

    For of the extremes Nicomachean Ethics Second Edition book is more erroneous, one less so; therefore, since to hit the mean is hard in the extreme, we must as a second best, as people say, take the least of the evils; and this will be done best in the way we describe. An appropriate attitude toward pleasure and pain is one of the most important habits to develop for moral virtue. But the pleasure does not complete it in the same way as the combination of object and sense, both good, just as health and the doctor are not in the same way the cause of a man's being healthy. So an activity suffers contrary effects from its proper pleasures and pains, i. Relaxation, then, is not an end; for it is taken for the sake of activity. Aristotle also mentions two other possibilities that he argues can be put aside: Having virtue but being inactive, even suffering evils and misfortunes, which Aristotle says no one would consider unless they were defending a hypothesis.


Share this book
You might also like
Construction & maintenance of unsealed roads

Construction & maintenance of unsealed roads

Recreation in Michigan

Recreation in Michigan

Progress and poverty

Progress and poverty

Planning for leisure in a new town centre

Planning for leisure in a new town centre

Rogue Bolo

Rogue Bolo

Within the wound

Within the wound

Parish, school, and college sermons

Parish, school, and college sermons

rejection of Saul in the perspective of the Deuteronomistic school

rejection of Saul in the perspective of the Deuteronomistic school

Reflections on Spanish-American poetry.

Reflections on Spanish-American poetry.

Guidebook to man-made textile fibers and textured yarns of the world

Guidebook to man-made textile fibers and textured yarns of the world

Majorca and Minorca

Majorca and Minorca

Growing up as a woman writer

Growing up as a woman writer

Garcia Marquez

Garcia Marquez

No-fines concrete

No-fines concrete

The Longest day

The Longest day

Nicomachean Ethics Second Edition (Hackett Publishing Co.) Download PDF Ebook

The headings in the translation are mine, with no authority in Aristotle. Moreover, to be happy takes a complete lifetime; for one swallow does not make a spring. But this is no doubt difficult, and Nicomachean Ethics Second Edition book in individual cases; for or is not easy to determine both how and with whom and on what provocation and how long one should be angry; for we too sometimes praise those who fall short and call them good-tempered, but sometimes we praise those who get angry and call them manly.

The same proportion is not found in all things, nor a single proportion always in the same thing, but it may be relaxed and yet persist up to a point, and it may differ in degree.

For these cannot be ascribed to Nicomachean Ethics Second Edition book things, but only to those that are divisible and not wholes; there is no coming into being of seeing nor of a point nor of a unit, nor is any of these a movement or coming into being; therefore there is no movement or coming into Nicomachean Ethics Second Edition book of pleasure either; for it is a whole.

The man, however, who deviates little from goodness is not blamed, whether he do so in the direction of the more or of the less, but only the man who deviates more widely; for he does not fail to be noticed. Now our predecessors have left the subject of legislation to us unexamined; it is perhaps best, therefore, that we should ourselves study it, and in general study the question of the constitution, in order to complete to the best of our ability our philosophy of human nature.

Now neither the virtues nor the vices are passions, because we are not called good or bad on the ground of our passions, but are so called on the ground of our virtues and our vices, and because we are neither praised nor blamed for our passions for the man who feels fear or anger is not praised, nor is the Nicomachean Ethics Second Edition book who simply feels anger blamed, but the man who feels it in a certain waybut for our virtues and our vices we are praised or blamed.

We describe as contrary to the mean, then, rather the directions in which we more often go to great lengths; and therefore self-indulgence, which is an excess, Nicomachean Ethics Second Edition book the more contrary to temperance.

There has not been lack of anything of which they could be the supplying anew. Hence he who aims at the intermediate must first depart from what is the more contrary to it, as Calypso advises- Hold the ship out beyond that surf and spray.

Ethics, unlike some other types of philosophy, is inexact and uncertain. Now if it is from the feeling of pleasure that they judge thus, the same will be true of justice and the other virtues, in respect of which we plainly say that people of a certain character are so more or less, and act more or less in accordance with these virtues; for people may be more just or brave, and it is possible also to act justly or temperately more or less.

With regard to feelings of fear and confidence courage is the mean; of the people who exceed, he who exceeds in fearlessness has no name many of the states have no namewhile the man who exceeds in confidence is rash, and he who exceeds in fear and falls short in confidence is a coward.

Aristotle also mentions two other possibilities that he argues can be put aside: Having virtue but being inactive, even suffering evils and misfortunes, which Aristotle says no one would consider unless they were defending a hypothesis. To describe more clearly what happiness is like, Aristotle next asks what the work ergon of a human is.

He, therefore, is the dearest to the gods. But to amuse oneself in order that one may exert oneself, as Anacharsis puts it, seems right; for amusement is a sort of relaxation, and we need relaxation because we cannot work continuously. However that may be, if as we have said the man who is to be good must be well trained and habituated, and go on to spend his time in worthy occupations and neither willingly nor unwillingly do bad actions, and if this can be brought about if men live in accordance with a sort of reason and right order, provided this has force,-if this be so, the paternal command indeed has not the required force or compulsive power nor in general has the command of one man, unless he be a king or something similarbut the law has compulsive power, while it is at the same time a rule proceeding from a sort of practical wisdom and reason.

Aristotle points to the fact that many aims are really only intermediate aims, and are desired only because they make the achievement of higher aims possible. Aristotle lists some of the principle virtues along with their corresponding vices of excess and deficiency in a table of virtues and vices.

While most of our actions are done for the sake of some higher end, there is an ultimate end beyond which we wish nothing more. This is the first case mentioned, and it is mentioned within the initial discussion of practical examples of virtues and vices at b Book IV. For they seem to be bound up together and not to admit of separation, since without activity pleasure does not arise, and every activity is completed by the attendant pleasure.

Since every sense is active in relation to its object, and a sense which is in good condition acts perfectly in relation to the most beautiful of its objects for perfect activity seems to be ideally of this nature; whether we say that it is active, or the organ in which it resides, may be assumed to be immaterialit follows that in the case of each sense the best activity is that of the best-conditioned organ in relation to the finest of its objects.

But it is difficult to get from youth up a right training for virtue if one has not been brought up under right laws; for to live temperately and hardily is not pleasant to most people, especially when they are young.

True arguments seem, then, most useful, not only with a view to knowledge, but with a view to life also; for since they harmonize with the facts they are believed, and so they stimulate those who understand them to live according to them. Each of these three commonly proposed happy ways of life represents targets that some people aim at for their own sake, just like they aim at happiness itself for its own sake.

Again, it is possible to fail in many ways for evil belongs to the class of the unlimited, as the Pythagoreans conjectured, and good to that of the limitedwhile to succeed is possible only in one way for which reason also one is easy and the other difficult- to miss the mark easy, to hit it difficult ; for these reasons also, then, excess and defect are characteristic of vice, and the mean of virtue; For men are good in but one way, but bad in many.

He also asserts as part of this starting point that virtue for a human must involve reason in thought and speech logosas this is an aspect an ergon, literally meaning a task or work of human living.

Search Results for

Righteous indignation Greek: nemesis is a sort of mean between joy at the misfortunes of others and envy.The Nicomachean Ethics Introduction Get Happy. Of all the things that Aristotle spoke Nicomachean Ethics Second Edition book wrote about—and there are a lot, from politics to the arts and sciences—he's best known by modern audiences for his answer to a basic human question: what does it mean to be happy?.

Good question, right? We all want to know the answer to that one. And Aristotle pondered this question long and hard. Commentary: Quite a few comments have been posted Nicomachean Ethics Second Edition book Nicomachean Ethics. Download: A text-only version is available for download.

Nicomachean Ethics By Aristotle Written B.C.E Even medical men do not seem to be made by a study of text-books. Yet people try, at any rate, to state not only the treatments. Nicomachean Ethics by Aristotle, part of the Internet Classics Archive Book II: 1 Virtue, then, being we must as a second best, as people say, take the least of the evils; and this will be done best in the way we describe.

But we must consider the things towards which we .[PDF]The Nicomachean Ethics by Aristotle Book Free Download ( pages) Free pdf or read online The Nicomachean Ethics pdf (ePUB) book.

The first edition of this novel was published inand was written by Aristotle/5.Mar 10,  · Building on the strengths of the first edition, the second edition of the Irwin Nicomachean Ethics features a revised translation (with little editorial intervention /5(7).May 15,  · Nicomachean Ebook (The New Hackett Ebook and millions of other books are available for Amazon Kindle.

Learn more. Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required/5(9).